Secret agent testifies: “I heard three shots when Kennedy was assassinated”

Published 15 September 2023
- By Editorial Staff
The Kennedys and John Connally in the limousine shortly before the assassination.

The former Secret Service agent Paul Landis, who was right behind U.S. President John F. Kennedy when he was shot in 1963, says in an interview that he heard two more shots at the time, raising new questions about the official narrative surrounding the assassination.

Landis had not previously provided his testimony but has finally decided to break his silence in an interview with the New York Times. It was Landis himself who discovered what the media later termed the “magic bullet,” although it was subsequently lost before being ultimately found on the gurney where Texas Governor John Connally had been carried.

The discovery of the bullet was used to promote the theory that a single bullet had first passed through the president’s neck before causing several injuries to the governor. Landis quit after the assassination and refused to participate in the investigation, but now, at 88 years old, has written the book The Final Witness, where he questions the results of the official investigation.

His thesis is that the “magic bullet” had in fact been transferred from one gurney to another when these were pressed together, and that the security at the crime scene was extremely poor.

There was nobody there to secure the scene… All the agents that were there were focused on the president.

He further states that the “magic bullet” lacked the necessary velocity to penetrate Kennedy’s body – something that casts doubt on the theory that the accused murderer Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone.

Landis also suspects that the bullet could have been misidentified after being handed over to the Secret Service.

Historian James Robenalt, who also worked on the book, believes the agent’s testimony could revive the debate about a second shooter at the time of the assassination.

If what he says is true, which I tend to believe, it is likely to reopen the question of a second shooter, if not even more. If the bullet we know as the magic or pristine bullet stopped in President Kennedy’s back, it means that the central thesis of the Warren Report, the single-bullet theory, is wrong, he concludes.

According to the FBI’s reconstruction of the events, Oswald could not have had time to fire two separate shots to hit both the president and Governor Connally.